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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in place until a new parliament is formed. so technically, he's going to be the most powerful man essentially he can do whatever he wants, without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, john, that has a lot of his opponents describing this as an undemocratic power grab. >> and do these changes affect both his creditics and opponents or just his opponents? >> reporter: well, look. right now, the political landscape favors mr. morsi and his political movement the, the muslim brotherhood, and certainly these decre
where we were before. >> brown: among the protestors in cairo were two men who ran against mr. morsi-- hamdin sabbahi from the leftist al- karamah party, and constitution party founder mohamed el- baradei, who tweeted yesterday that morsi had appointed himself "a new pharaoh." in his decree, morsi also held out the possibility of a second trial for hosni mubarek for the killings of protestors. >> suarez: to explain why morsi took these steps and the reaction that followed, i'm joined by nathan brown, an expert on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 yea
the scene for us this morning and how important mr. morsi is in the solution we see here. >> reporter: yeah, christine, this is another critical day in this conflict. a lot of people anxious to see what happens in the coming hours. it's a little after 12:00 noon cairo time and in a couple of hours secretary clinton is scheduled to arrive in cairo meeting with the egyptian president mohammad morsi as well as the arab league. whenever big conflicts happen in the middle east, washington wants to be seen as playing a major role as peacemaker. that is clearly why mrs. clinton is in the region today, but it is also clear that throughout the past few days it's been egypt that's taking the lead as peacemaker. obviously, they have strong links to hamas and they also have links with israel with that peace treaty they have promised to abide by. so they seem to be logical peacemaker. yesterday they were optimistic that a cease-fire would be established. mr. morsi says he expects the aggression to stop. obviously, christine, that didn't happen. heavy fighting throughout the night and the early morning h
there are a lot of questions about mr. morsi and where he really stands and with whom he's really allied. president obama, he said during the campaign that he wouldn't -- he raised the question about whether egypt was still an ally. then today he said the report was that he reaffirmed our close partnership with egypt, and what news do you make of that? what are they trying to tell us with that statement? >> they may be trying to send a signal. it was only two months ago in a television interview the president was asked whether he considered egypt an ally and he suggested no. president morsi has a lot of proving to do essentially in terms of governing. the white house fully aware president morsi is a member of the muslim brotherhood. there are a lot of questions around the world whether he will play a constructive role in this. the white house used the word partnership with egypt. they are stopping short of calling him an ally perhaps because of the fact they are trying to hold a stick over him. you have got republicans on capitol hill talking in recent days about cutting off u.s. aid fro
the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israel. but the problem is, washington does not have a relationship with hamas. the u.s. sees hamas as a terrorist group, of course. i think that's where egypt could play a significant role here. look for secretary clinton to push egypt, its president, mohamed morsi, to get hamas to make some concessions to possibly hammer out a cease fire. yesterday egyptian officials were optimistic that a cease fire would come. today, it's not the case. all parties here seem to be continuing the push to hammer out some sort of truce while the
, obama found in his phone calls that mr. morsi recognized the danger of an escalating conflict. in the long run as the united states have an expanded role in what is going on over there? guest: in the end without some american intervention or leadership role, it is very difficult to envision a genuine comprehensive peace. the parties have to want it. and it is clear. part of the problem for mr. obama is that when he came to office the first time around, he did make that a central issue. he appointed senator mitchell as the first envoy. it was a priority position for him. and he did not get anywhere. in part, the in the arm it was really good for it. more importantly, the government really did not cooperate with him as he had expected. and the relationship between the prime minister and obama was not very good and has not been a very good. this is an opportunity for the israelis to rebuild it now that he has won reelection. it is no secret that the israelis preferred to see met romney become president. that was an issue. but he felt he did a lot and did not get anywhere. the eco
they are able to pull that off. in the longer term it's a real balancing act for mr. morsi. here on the streets he has a population strongly in support of the palestinians but he's got to keep the peace. to keep the peace he's going to get western investments and see this economy going. we are seeing evidence of that balancing act behind me off in the distance, a small crowd of protestors teargassed a few moments ago and we could expect larger numbers on the streets tomorrow, gregg. gregg: thanks very much. ainsley: what does the cease-fire mean? what does the end game mean in the middle east. jonathan sanzer the founder of defense for democracy and the author of hamas vs. fatah, the struggle for palestine. happy thanksgiving to you. >> thank you. happy tkpapbghappen happy thanksgiving. >> i think the israelis and hamas are both claiming victory. the israelis got what they were looking for long range rockets smuggled in see a sudan. they took out all the rockets. for hamas 4 they were able to fire rockets into the israeli heartland. i don't think they will be able to do it to the extent of this
. >> as the protests intensified, mr. morsy asked for calm. for those that gathered out of the pal lace, he defended hits decrees and defended accusations of a power grab. >> translator: i didn't take a decision against anyone or pick a side against another. i have to put myself in a clear bath, a path that achiefs a clear goal. >> it's now after midnight, and pockets of clashes continue around tahrir square, and many of the demonstrators are pitching tents, an indication the demonstrations could continue through the weekend. >>> only two days ago, secretary of state hillary clinton was praising the egyptian government for it's leadership in bringing stability and peace to the east. let's go to dan lothian. >> reporter: there is concern about too much power in the hands of one man. he played a key role in that cease fire, he developed what one official says is a relationship of trust with president obama, but as we know with every relationship, things can get complicated. >> at the white house, a sense of calm, kicking off the holiday season with the arrival of a 19 foot christmas tree. >> it is per
this is unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease fire which is incredibly fragile, but this is not acceptable. this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect. our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> that's the issue, the money. >> if you hold that -- >> there are millions of dollars at stake here. >> billions of dollars. congress says look we are going to withhold this money until there's a movement there all of the aid that goes to that region is pulled. >> holding money is one thing but maybe you withhold the praise they showered on morsi after he stepped in between hamas and israel. they were quick to praise him. >> they didn't know he was going to do a power grab. why not treat someone with honey who you think are on your side. >> why because a lot of people will tell you they were funneling arms from egypt to hamas that's how this got started from iran to egypt to hamas. >> let us know what you think about the latest developm
with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and egyptian president morsi and decide d that mrs. clinton needed to be there in person. she'll travel to israel first and then ramallah in the west bank and cairo to try to curtail the violence. >> clinton will emphasize the united states interests in a peaceful outcome. an outcome that can lead to improved conditions for the civilian residents of gaza. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only
times called egypt's new president mohamed morsi to ask what it would take to stop the violence. mr. obama then sent secretary of state clinton to the middle east. the violence in gaza has forced the administration back into the middleman role it seemed to abandon last year when two years of work by middle east special envoy george mitchell came up empty. but now under the threat of war the u.s. sees little choice except to step in. secretary clinton will ask the palestinians to stop the rocket attacks and ask israel to offer more hope of a longer term peace agreement. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of the israelis and palestinians alike. >> reporter: the crucial player now is president morsi of egypt whose islamist government openly supports hamas because the u.s. and israel see hamas as a terrorist organization, morsi is essentially the go-between. this is new ground for both the president and the secretary of state. regional and popular support for hamas and the palestinians has never bee
president morsi, closed the deal as this official said. they also praised secretary clinton saying that she did an exceptional job. but again going back to what they are saying as mr. obama was very directly involved. one of the things also, wolf, that they're pointing at that i think will prove to be very important is this burgeoning relationship with the egyptian president morsi. i mean, just think of it. just a short time ago he was the new man on the block, muslim brotherhood, lots of doubts about him. and now look at the words that the president used. there's a lot of praise for his personal role in bringing about this cease-fire. that could go a long way. in fact, they say that he was very pragmatic. that's president morsi, very pragmatic. they developed a relationship they say based on trust and were able to work through these issues. so down the road that's going to be important, wolf. >> basically the bottom line in all of this is that the u.s. is also, jill, provided some assurances to both the israeli government of prime minister netanyahu and the egyptian government of president
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)